Reclassifying a Thyroid Tumor

Led by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, an international panel of pathologists and clinicians has reclassified a type of thyroid cancer to reflect that it is noninvasive and has a low risk of recurrence. The name change, described today in JAMA Oncology, is expected to reduce the psychological and medical consequences of a cancer diagnosis, potentially affecting thousands of people worldwide. The incidence of thyroid cancer has been rising partly due to early detection of tumors … Read More

Now Able To Image Up To 24 Specific BioMolecules

Researchers at Columbia University have made a significant step toward breaking the so-called “color barrier” of light microscopy for biological systems, allowing for much more comprehensive, system-wide labeling and imaging of a greater number of biomolecules in living cells and tissues than is currently attainable. The advancement has the potential for many future applications, including helping to guide the development of therapies to treat and cure disease. In a study published online April 19 in Nature, the team, led by … Read More

Oncodomains and How They Affect Cancer-Causing Mutations

Scientists have identified thousands of previously ignored genetic mutations that, although rare, likely contribute to cancer growth. The findings, which could help pave the way to new treatments, are published in PLOS Computational Biology. Cancer arises when genetic mutations in a cell cause abnormal growth that leads to a tumor. Some cancer drugs exploit this to attack tumor cells by targeting proteins that are mutated from their usual form because of mutations in the genes that encode them. However, only … Read More

Bile Duct Cancer and Potential Risk Factor-Bacteria

An international research collaboration has identified bacteria in the bile duct as a potential risk factor in the development of bile duct cancer, or cholangiocarcinoma (CCA), a rare but aggressive form of cancer with symptoms that do not present themselves at the early stages.  CCA is associated with multiple risk factors that are geographically distinct — choledocal cysts and primary sclerosing cholangitis have been implicated in the development of CCA in Western populations, while infections by the liver fluke parasite … Read More

Do Anxiety and Depression have An Effect On Lung Cancer Survival Rates?

Patients who experience anxiety and depression after being diagnosed with advanced lung cancer are more likely to die sooner, according to new research from the University of British Columbia and BC Cancer Agency. The study, published this month in the Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, is among the first to examine the effect of anxiety and depression on survival rates for lung cancer patients. The findings build on similar previous research looking at breast cancer patients, further deepening scientists’ … Read More

How are EGFR (Epidermal Growth Factor Receptors) Connected To Cancer?

EGFR (Epidermal Growth Factor Receptors) are involved in the development and progression of many types of cancer and bowel cancer (colon carcinoma) in particular. So-called anti-EGFR antibodies are used in the treatment of bowel cancer patients, to inhibit EGFR. However, for reasons that are not yet clear, not all patients benefit from this treatment. This could be due to the fact that EGFR is not only found in the tumor cells of bowel cancer patients but also in the immune … Read More

An Anti-Malaria Drug Used In Cancer Treatment

After her brain cancer became resistant to chemotherapy and then to targeted treatments, 26-year-old Lisa Rosendahl’s doctors gave her only a few months to live. Now a paper published January 17 in the journal eLife describes a new drug combination that has stabilized Rosendahl’s disease and increased both the quantity and quality of her life: Adding the anti-malaria drug chloroquine to her treatment stopped an essential process that Rosendahl’s cancer cells had been using to resist therapy, re-sensitizing her cancer … Read More

Is Prostate Cancer and High Blood Cholesterol Connected?

Now a team led by researchers at the Duke Cancer Institute have identified a cellular process that cancer cells hijack to hoard cholesterol and fuel their growth. Identifying this process could inform the development of better ways to control cholesterol accumulation in tumors, potentially leading to improved survival for prostate cancer patients. The findings are published online this month in the journal Cancer Research. “Prostate cancer cells, as well as some other solid tumors, have been shown to contain higher … Read More

The Protein Complex That Protects Telomeres — The Ends Of Our Chromosomes

Scientists at The Wistar Institute have unveiled part of the protein complex that protects telomeres — the ends of our chromosomes. The study, published online in Nature Communications, explains how a group of genetic mutations associated with this protein complex contributes to various cancers. Telomeres are the protective structures at the end of chromosomes and are essential for the faithful replication and protection of our genome. Defects in telomere function can lead to genomic instability in cancer, while the gradual … Read More

A nanoscale product of human cells plays an important role in intercellular communication

A nanoscale product of human cells that was once considered junk is now known to play an important role in intercellular communication and in many disease processes, including cancer metastasis. Researchers at Penn State have developed nanoprobes to rapidly isolate these rare markers, called extracellular vesicles (EVs), for potential development of precision cancer diagnoses and personalized anticancer treatments. “Most cells generate and secrete extracellular vesicles,” says Siyang Zheng, associate professor of biomedical engineering and electrical engineering. “But they are difficult … Read More