The Effects Of Amino Acids On Certain Cancers

Cutting out certain amino acids — the building blocks of proteins — from the diet of mice slows tumor growth and prolongs survival, according to new research published in Nature. Researchers at the Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute and the University of Glasgow found that removing two non-essential amino acids — serine and glycine — from the diet of mice slowed the development of lymphoma and intestinal cancer. The researchers also found that the special diet made some cancer cells … Read More

New Treatment Being Studied For Kidney Cancer

Kidney cancer patients may soon have more treatment choices that provide a higher quality of life, thanks to research completed by physician scientists at UT Southwestern Medical Center. Their recent study showed that treating metastatic kidney cancer with an advanced and focused form of radiation called stereotactic ablative radiation therapy achieves more than 90 percent control of local tumors, and offers the possibility of safely delaying systemic therapy. “This study shows that stereotactic radiation provides a good noninvasive alternative to … Read More

Does Cancer Spread By Eating A High Fat Diet?

Cancer is most deadly when it has begun to spread as successful treatment is much more difficult. Scientists around the globe are therefore trying to understand how the process occurs and develop new ways to stop it. Professor Benitah’s team found CD36 was present on metastatic cancer cells from patients with a range of different tumors including oral tumors, melanoma skin cancer, ovarian, bladder, lung and breast cancer. To confirm its essential role in cancer spread, they added CD36 to … Read More

Testicular Cancer Update

The findings may shed light on factors in other cancers that influence their sensitivity to chemotherapy, according to a report in Nature. Cancers of the testes are known as germ cell tumors (germ cells produce sperm and eggs). In 2016, about 8,720 new cases are expected in the U.S., with about 380 deaths. Although they are rare, primary testicular germ cell tumors are the most common solid cancers in young men. Most of the tumors are highly sensitive to chemotherapy, … Read More

Could A DNA Sample Be Used For Early Cancer Detection?

In the Feb. 20 issue of the journal Nature Methods, team members from Johns Hopkins University, the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research and the University of Toronto detailed their promising new method of detecting the presence of an extra mark on DNA called cytosine methylation. Cytosine is one of the four main genetic building blocks, or nucleotides, that make up DNA. Methylation simply refers to the presence of a biochemical (methyl) group attached to a nucleotide, in this case cytosine. … Read More

Do Cells Start Forming Cancer When The ‘Perfect Storm’ Exists?

The research, carried out by scientists at Cancer Research UK’s Cambridge Institute at the University of Cambridge and St Jude’s Children’s Research Hospital in the United States, shows that cancers are more likely to start in stem cells — special cells that copy themselves so the body can grow new cells, repair damaged tissue and replace old cells. But while these stem cells are more susceptible to developing into cancer, they also need to have accumulated DNA mistakes and be … Read More

Colon Cancer Research

Using the gene-editing system known as CRISPR, MIT researchers have shown in mice that they can generate colon tumors that very closely resemble human tumors. This advance should help scientists learn more about how the disease progresses and allow them to test new therapies. Once formed, many of these experimental tumors spread to the liver, just like human colon cancers often do. These metastases are the most common cause of death from colon cancer. “That’s been a missing piece in … Read More

Omega-3 Fatty Acids and the Blood-Brain Barrier

Already extolled for their health benefits as a food compound, omega-3 fatty acids now appear to also play a critical role in preserving the integrity of the blood-brain barrier, which protects the central nervous system from blood-borne bacteria, toxins and other pathogens, according to new research from Harvard Medical School. Reporting in the May 3 issue of Neuron, a team led by Chenghua Gu, associate professor of neurobiology at Harvard Medical School, describes the first molecular explanation for how the … Read More

Gaps In Preventing Skin Cancer Found

A large international survey on sun exposure behaviors and skin cancer detection found there are many imperfections and geographical inequalities in primary and secondary prevention of skin cancer. This information could help inform future awareness campaigns developed to address the global need to reduce mid- and long-term development of skin cancer. The study was published in the Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology & Venereology by researchers from La Roche-Posay and the George Washington University (GW) Department of Dermatology. … Read More

Pediatric Cancer Helped By Genetically Engineered T Cells

Two infants diagnosed with a relapsed form of childhood cancer who had previously exhausted all other treatment options remain disease-free after receiving a first-in-human experimental therapy that uses genetically engineered T cells, a new analysis reports. Such cell-based approaches have been difficult to implement in young children, a population in which B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is highly prevalent, representing 25% of all pediatric cancer cases in the United States. Several options exist for treating ALL in children between … Read More