A High-Fat Diet Linked To Colon Cancer

Poor diet is associated with 80% of colorectal cancer cases, but the exact pathways by which diet leads to cancer are not known. In a newly published study, Cleveland Clinic researchers have identified a specific molecular pathway that plays a key role in the link between a high-fat diet and tumor growth in the colon. In the July 6 issue of Stem Cell Reports, the team showed in pre-clinical models that cancer stem cell growth in the colon was enhanced … Read More

Could Olive Oil Help To Prevent Brain Cancer?

A compound found in olive oil may help to prevent cancer developing in the brain, a study shows. Research into oleic acid — the primary ingredient in olive oil — has shown how it can help prevent cancer-causing genes from functioning in cells. The oily substance — one of a group of nutrients known as fatty acids — stimulates the production of a cell molecule whose function is to prevent cancer-causing proteins from forming. The study team says it is … Read More

Gut Bacteria and the Brain’s Blood Vessels

A study in mice and humans suggests that bacteria in the gut can influence the structure of the brain’s blood vessels, and may be responsible for producing malformations that can lead to stroke or epilepsy. The research, published in Nature, adds to an emerging picture that connects intestinal microbes and disorders of the nervous system. The study was funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), a part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Cerebral cavernous … Read More

How Stimulating Your Brain Affects Mental Health In Older Age

The large-scale investigation published in the journal PLOS Medicine and led by the University of Exeter, used data from more than 2,000 mentally fit people over the age of 65, examined the theory that experiences in early or mid life which challenge the brain make people more resilient to changes resulting from age or illness — they have higher “cognitive reserve.” The analysis, funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) found that people with higher levels of reserve … Read More

Gaps In Preventing Skin Cancer Found

A large international survey on sun exposure behaviors and skin cancer detection found there are many imperfections and geographical inequalities in primary and secondary prevention of skin cancer. This information could help inform future awareness campaigns developed to address the global need to reduce mid- and long-term development of skin cancer. The study was published in the Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology & Venereology by researchers from La Roche-Posay and the George Washington University (GW) Department of Dermatology. … Read More

There are 2 types of cancer vaccines: Prevention vaccines and Treatment vaccines

Vaccines, also called vaccinations, are medicines that help the body fight disease. They help train the immune system to recognize and destroy harmful substances. There are 2 types of cancer vaccines: Prevention vaccines Treatment vaccines Cancer prevention vaccines Doctors give prevention vaccines to healthy people to keep certain cancers from developing. Like vaccines for the chicken pox or the flu, they protect the body from viruses that can cause disease. A person has to get the vaccine before the virus … Read More

Cancer signs and early detection

15 Cancer Symptoms Women Shouldn’t Ignore Women’s bodies are always changing. Sometimes changes that seem normal can be signs of cancer, though. The key is to pay attention to your body so you can notice when something’s different, says Robyn Andersen, PhD, of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle. “New symptoms indicate something has changed in your body, and you want to know what that means.” read more Dr. Stegall’s Comments: The overall theme here is to have … Read More

New technologies leading to a simple blood test for cancer

Fast DNA-sequencing machines are leading to simple blood tests for cancer. Labs around the world are working toward developing cancer screening tests based on a simple blood draw. That’s possible because dying cancer cells also shed DNA into a person’s blood. Early on, the amount is vanishingly small—and obscured by the healthy DNA that also circulates. That makes it difficult to measure. But Lo says the objective is simple: an annual blood test that finds cancer while it’s curable. Cancers … Read More