New Possible Treatment Approach For Two Types Of Brain Tumors

Detailed analysis of two brain tumor subtypes has revealed that they may originate from the same type of neural progenitor cells and be distinguished by gene mutation patterns and by the composition of their microenvironments. The results of a study led by investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard are being published in the March 31 issue of Science. “Our study redefines the cellular composition of two closely related gliomas characterized by mutations … Read More

Colon Cancer Research

Using the gene-editing system known as CRISPR, MIT researchers have shown in mice that they can generate colon tumors that very closely resemble human tumors. This advance should help scientists learn more about how the disease progresses and allow them to test new therapies. Once formed, many of these experimental tumors spread to the liver, just like human colon cancers often do. These metastases are the most common cause of death from colon cancer. “That’s been a missing piece in … Read More

Sunscreen Affects Vitamin D Deficiency and Disease Outcome

Results from a clinical review published in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association find nearly 1 billion people worldwide may have deficient or insufficient levels of vitamin D due to chronic disease and inadequate sun exposure related to sunscreen use. The study also found that 95 percent of African American adults may have vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency. Vitamin D variations among races are attributed to differences in skin pigmentation. People are spending less time outside and, when they … Read More

Omega-3 Fatty Acids and the Blood-Brain Barrier

Already extolled for their health benefits as a food compound, omega-3 fatty acids now appear to also play a critical role in preserving the integrity of the blood-brain barrier, which protects the central nervous system from blood-borne bacteria, toxins and other pathogens, according to new research from Harvard Medical School. Reporting in the May 3 issue of Neuron, a team led by Chenghua Gu, associate professor of neurobiology at Harvard Medical School, describes the first molecular explanation for how the … Read More

Platelets, T-cells and Cancer

Blood platelets help disguise cancer from the immune system by suppressing T cells, report scientists at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) in the May 5, 2017 issue of Science Immunology. In extensive preclinical tests, a promising T cell therapy more successfully boosted immunity against melanoma when common antiplatelet drugs such as aspirin were added. Zihai Li, M.D., Ph.D., senior author on the article, is chair of the MUSC Department of Microbiology and Immunology, the program leader for the … Read More

Inflammatory Breast Cancer and BPA Study

The chemical bisphenol A, or BPA, appears to aid the survival of inflammatory breast cancer cells, revealing a potential mechanism for how the disease grows, according to a study led by researchers in the Department of Surgery at Duke University School of Medicine and the Duke Cancer Institute. Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the most lethal and fastest-growing form of breast cancer and quickly develops resistance to treatments. Reporting in the March issue of the journal Carcinogenesis, senior author Gayathri … Read More

Gaps In Preventing Skin Cancer Found

A large international survey on sun exposure behaviors and skin cancer detection found there are many imperfections and geographical inequalities in primary and secondary prevention of skin cancer. This information could help inform future awareness campaigns developed to address the global need to reduce mid- and long-term development of skin cancer. The study was published in the Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology & Venereology by researchers from La Roche-Posay and the George Washington University (GW) Department of Dermatology. … Read More

Pediatric Cancer Helped By Genetically Engineered T Cells

Two infants diagnosed with a relapsed form of childhood cancer who had previously exhausted all other treatment options remain disease-free after receiving a first-in-human experimental therapy that uses genetically engineered T cells, a new analysis reports. Such cell-based approaches have been difficult to implement in young children, a population in which B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is highly prevalent, representing 25% of all pediatric cancer cases in the United States. Several options exist for treating ALL in children between … Read More

Non-Adherence To Taking Cancer Drugs Affects Oral Cancer Treatment Outcomes

The development of oral cancer drugs as a modality therapy over the last decade has highlighted the problem of non-adherence. Only cancer drugs that are taken can actually work. Contrary to what is expected, a significant share of cancer patients doesn’t take their cancer drugs as prescribed. Presented at the ESMO Congress 2016, the results of a new study by Professor Florence Joly and Dr Melanie Dos Santos of the Centre Francois Baclesse in Caen, on the “Impact of cognitive … Read More

Reclassifying a Thyroid Tumor

Led by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, an international panel of pathologists and clinicians has reclassified a type of thyroid cancer to reflect that it is noninvasive and has a low risk of recurrence. The name change, described today in JAMA Oncology, is expected to reduce the psychological and medical consequences of a cancer diagnosis, potentially affecting thousands of people worldwide. The incidence of thyroid cancer has been rising partly due to early detection of tumors … Read More